Six Tips Before You Start Tai Chi Class

Tag: taijiquan

I’ve been an Instructor of Tai Chi for a number of years now, and a student of Tai Chi much longer than that. Over that time my knowledge and understanding of what Tai Chi ‘is’ has changed and evolved from the first time I stepped into a class, and certainly from my idea of what it was before I took my first class. In hindsight, I can honestly say I had no idea what Tai Chi ‘is’, or what to expect from attempting to learn it. Today my only regret is that I didn’t start learning it many years before that first class!

Over more than 20 years involvement in Tai Chi I’ve seen a lot of students come and go. Of the ones that go, there is, in my observation, a lot of leave because the class they attend turns out to be something different than what they expected, or what they are looking for. Similarly, many people who I talk to about Tai Chi and encourage to take it on don’t because they’ve already formed an idea (bias might be a better word) of what it is and determined it’s not for them.

I’m known for saying, “if I had my way, everybody would do Tai Chi.” I say this as a Tai Chi Instructor, as a physical therapist, as a friend and colleague, as a parent, as a member of the community. In my personal and professional opinions – biased though they might be – Tai Chi (and Qigong) is one of the few things that can benefit everyone who does it.

So if you’re debating whether to try a Tai Chi class, or maybe you’ve just started or just about to start a class, I’d like to offer you six pieces of advice so that you can get the most from your introduction to Tai Chi.

Keep an Open Mind

Many people who begin Tai Chi usually do so with an idea of what it’s going to be like – and often, that idea is not at all what it turns out to be. I feel this is because our broader society has developed a preconceived idea – a stereotype, if you like – of what Tai Chi ‘is’. For example:

  • Tai Chi is just for “old people” (it is not, it’s for everybody and the younger you start the more benefit you’ll get);
  • Tai Chi is just slow movements/exercises (it is not; not only are there sets and styles where at least some movements are performed very quickly, Tai Chi requires attention and focus to understand not just the movements but the affect they have on the body, the mind and the spirit);
  • Tai Chi isn’t a real martial art (it is – taijiquan, the Grand Ultimate Fist – even if the martial aspect is not always emphasized, the martial art is still there);
  • Tai Chi isn’t really exercise (it is, and research is finding it’s just as, if not more, effective as other forms of low- to moderate-intensity exercises for building strength, balance, endurance and improving flexibility, reducing weight, benefiting mental and emotional states, etc.);

and the list goes on. The fact is: if you’ve never experienced Tai Chi for yourself, chances are you really don’t know what it’s about – and that’s a good thing! Even if you have undertaken some form of Tai Chi class, depending on the quality and experience of your Instructor, you may not have really been exposed to the essence of Tai Chi.

You must keep an open mind, and be willing to learn what Tai Chi is, and is all about. Forget the stereotypes. Understand that Tai Chi is as much about the experience as it is about performing the movements. In that respect, what Tai Chi ‘is’ becomes a very personal thing: you will come to realize that the question is not “what is Tai Chi?”, but rather, “what is Tai Chi to me?”. That way, you will get as much as you want to get from it – maybe even more.

It’s About Learning, Not Imitation

Starting a Tai Chi class is not like starting an exercise class. If you go to an aerobics class, or a spin class, or even some yoga classes, you are essentially just following along with the instructor or presenter. While there is an aspect of learning, especially if, for example, you need to follow a routine or perform an unfamiliar exercise, that learning often remains within the classroom. Few people would go home and practice what they did in class. Some might not even think about what they did once they walk out the door. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing; it’s more that these classes are structured in a way that you don’t need to learn the routines, because each time you come to class, you can just follow along with the the instructor says or does.

Tai Chi is different. Like any other skill set, getting the most out of Tai Chi means that you need to learn it; not just the what or the how but the when, where and why as well. This involves more than just practice (though as you’ll see below that’s important as well!) – it always requires some absorption and reflection of each lesson you take. If you only attend class and try to follow along with what the Instructor or the other students are doing, without giving the time and attention to learning for yourself what needs to be done, then ultimately you might be engaging in some useful exercise, perhaps even practicing some good Kung Fu, but you will not be performing Tai Chi.

Be Patient

One of my favorite sayings related to Tai Chi is: “How long does it take to learn Tai Chi? More than one lifetime.” Your initial reaction to this might be, “why bother then?”; hear me out.

Now more than ever, our society has instilled in us a sense, dare I say a need, for instant gratification. So many things can be offered and provided to us on demand, that it’s become an expectation that anything that we want or need we can have right now. This isn’t just about information: if we’re hungry, there’s drive thru, or microwavable meals, or snacks. If I want something, I go to a store and buy it, or better yet, order it online and have it delivered to me, sometimes within the same day. No money? Get it on credit. Want to lose weight? Don’t spend months or years on exercising – take this drug. While these things benefit us in many ways and can make our lives easier and more enjoyable, it also skews our expectations when it comes to things that take time and effort to gain.

As an Instructor I see it a lot. There are always people who join the class and are constantly wanting to move things along, to learn the next movement or next section or next form, even though they don’t know what I’ve already shown them! I call this the “I want Tai Chi now” mentality.

It doesn’t work like that. Unfortunately, there are people out there who take advantage of this mentality in society and promise to be able to teach you Tai Chi in weekend, or become an Instructor in two weeks. Again: it doesn’t work like that. Yet for some people, when they don’t get Tai Chi “now”, they get frustrated, and then discouraged, and then give up.

Learning Tai Chi is a process, and as your understanding of it deepens with experience, you will come to realize it’s an ongoing process. There is always something more to learn, something more to explore, something that can be improved upon or refined further. I’ve been fortunate in my lifetime and experience to have worked with a number of martial arts Masters who, after 40, or 50, or even 60 years of practicing their art still refer to themselves as “students”. As my Master often said, “when you think you’ve got it, go deeper.”

Understand this: you are not expected to understand everything, and perform your Tai Chi at a Master level, after your first class. Or even after your tenth, or hundredth, or thousandth class. It is not about “getting it right”. It’s about growing, developing, and improving over time. A good Instructor will understand this and demonstrate the patience needed to achieve this by allowing you to work at your own pace. You just need the patience to continue to want to strive for it. I often tell my students that every time I perform my Tai Chi, I learn something new, and my hope is I never stop learning.

Ask Questions

Were you one of those people at school that didn’t like to ask questions? Either because you thought you already knew it, or your classmates would laugh at you, or your were afraid of looking stupid, or for some other reason that probably seemed important at the time, but on reflection really wasn’t? I was, and it took time and effort for me to overcome that. However, if I hadn’t, I wouldn’t be writing this article for you to read today.

The only way to learn something, to strengthen your understanding and become proficient at something, is to ask questions. This is more than just putting up your hand in class and asking a question, though that is important and something I definitely encourage. It’s about seeking out the information that you need in order for the thing your learning to become meaningful to you. This might mean putting up your hand, however it might also mean having a discussion with your Instructor and/or your other classmates, or reading a book or online article, or watching a video, or even just some self-reflection. It might also mean that instead of an answer you’re left with more questions – that’s great! It’s that kind of thinking that will lead you to more knowledge and a greater understanding.

If you want to learn Tai Chi, ask a lot of questions. As I often say to my students: the question you have is probably one that ten other students have, yet if none of you ask it, all of you miss out on the opportunity to learn.

Practice. Practice. Practice.

A previous Master of a different martial art style used to reflect on his Master’s response when he got something correct: “Good! Now, do it ten thousand times!”

If you want to learn and become good at anything, you must devote time to practicing it, and Tai Chi is no exception. Elite sports agencies – those involved in top-level professional sports or events such as the Olympics – have determined through research that to achieve an ‘elite’ or ‘master’ level in a sport, an athlete needs to train for at least 10,000 hours. To put that in perspective, if you practiced for one hour every single day, it would take about 27 years and 4 months to achieve ‘elite’ or ‘master’ status – and that’s before we even look at the quality of your practice. I can assure you that blazing fastball you see a pitcher deliver came about from thousands of hours and tens-of-thousands of pitches prior to that one. Similarly, that stunning ballet performance that looks so strong and graceful and effortless came from thousands and thousands of hours practicing different positions and learning new choreography.

I’m not saying you have to devote that much time to your Tai Chi, however it is important to understand that you do need to practice in at least some capacity in order to be able to learn it effectively.

In the first instance, you need to learn the movements, and the sequence they are performed in. A typical Tai Chi class will seek to teach you more and more of the sequence with each class. This means that with each successive class, you are expected to remember (at least for the most part) what the previous movement you learned was. Unless you have an exceptional talent for learning new skills, or an eidetic memory, you are going to need to practice what you’ve learned in order to be able to retain it and then build upon it from class to class.

Once you know the sequence well enough to perform it from start to finish, the real work of finding your Tai Chi begins. There is always refinement to be done, always things that can be improved. My Tai Chi today is different from the Tai Chi I was doing when I was competing years ago, which was far different from the Tai Chi I was doing when I first started. You can only achieve this growth through practice.

Enjoy

Though I put this last, in could also be the first thing to consider. Arguably the most important piece of advice I can give you to learn Tai Chi is: enjoy it. Take pleasure in learning something new, in performing your forms, in seeing how the Tai Chi affects your body, your mind, and your spirit over time. Enjoy the challenge that comes with learning Tai Chi. Make attending class the highlight (or at least one of them) of your day. When you can enjoy doing something it becomes less of a chore or a task and more something you want, even desire, to do. It becomes part of your life, part of who you are. Your Tai Chi should be a positive thing in your life, something that you look forward to, and feel great for having done it.

I look forward to seeing you in class!


Tag: taijiquan

Category : News

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy is please to announce it will start hosting workshops in 2023.

It is anticipated that up to six workshops will be held in 2023, with the first two schedule for January 14. WTCA’s workshops will focus on specific aspects of Tai Chi/Taijiquan and Qigong practice, and are aimed at giving attendees a deeper understanding of the principles and practice of Tai Chi. Most workshops will be open for public attendance although some prerequisites may need to be met in order to attend.

The first workshops will focus on an initial examination of the Thirteen Postures and the martial applications of Tai Chi forms. While only these two workshops have been formally announced, future workshops will build on these initial ones, while others will examine other aspects related to Tai Chi theory and practice including qi and Qigong practice.

Further information can be found at WTCA’s workshop page under the ‘What We Offer’ menu or by clicking here.


Tag: taijiquan

Let’s face it: being a student, especially at high school or tertiary level education, can be an extremely stressful time of life. Workloads, exams, and maintaining course requirements, in addition to the social and emotional pressures of being in a new environment and trying to maintain and enjoy a life both within and outside of school, places a tremendous amount of stress on a student, and maintains this stress for a significant amount of time. Long-term or chronic stress has been shown to have a detrimental affect on physical, mental and emotional health, and students who struggle to manage these stressors effectively often suffer from issues ranging from poor concentration and productivity, through sleep deprivation, weight gain, and poorer immune function, to more serious conditions such as anxiety, depression, and impaired social interactions. Managing these stressors and minimising their adverse affects are critical for a student to be successful not only in their studies but in their future life.

Tai Chi has been well researched as a means of promoting relaxation and reducing stress and anxiety, and researchers have been examining whether Tai Chi could be specifically beneficial for high school and college students. Much of the research does suggest that Tai Chi can be beneficial in many ways, and at least one systematic review of these studies1. has demonstrated a high level of evidence supporting Tai Chi as a means of reducing stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression, as well as improved interpersonal sensitivity (such as coping skills) and flexibility. It also demonstrated significant moderate level evidence (termed “secondary benefits”) including decreased compulsive behaviour, somatization symptoms (focus on pain, weakness, shortness of breath, often linked with subsequent physical and mental disorders), hostility and symptoms of phobia. These benefits alone had the researchers calling for higher education institutions to consider including Tai Chi with their provided services as a means of promoting students’ physical and psychological well-being.

Other studies have focused on specific benefits, such as perceived stress, task attention, mood, sleep quality and self-esteem. For example, a study by Calwell and associates2. showed that increased mindfulness through the practice of Tai Chi accounted for changes in mood and perceived stress, which in turn improved sleep quality. A review of the literature will find numerous other studies supporting these benefits and others associated with health management, such as reduced blood pressure and improved immune function.

A summary of potential benefits Tai Chi can have for students is as follows:

  • improved mental acuity (eg: attention, focus, clarity of thought);
  • improved and more stable mood and interpersonal sensitivity;
  • improved general health and fitness;
  • better sleep quality;
  • decreased perceived stress;
  • decreased anxiety and depression.

With these benefits in mind, Tai Chi should be considered as an effective complimentary activity towards an overall successful study program. Students are one of many groups of people who can gain great benefits from practicing Tai Chi.

References

  1. Webster, et al. (2015). A systematic review of the health benefits of Tai Chi for students in higher education. Preventive Medicine Reports 3: 103-112.
  2. Caldwell, et al. (2010). Developing Mindfulness in College Students Through Movement-Based Courses: Effects on Self-Regulatory Self-Efficacy, Mood, Stress, and Sleep Quality. Journal of American College Health, 58(5): 433-422.

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy offers a number of Tai Chi classes and has a Corporate and Community Qigong program to help more people access and enjoy the benefits of Tai Chi and Qigong.


Tag: taijiquan

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy strives to make Tai Chi and Qigong accessible to as many people as possible. While we always try to keep our fees as low as possible, in the current economic climate it can still be challenging for people to afford engaging in activities which are additional to their regular monthly expenses. To try and ease financial burden on people and continue to make Tai Chi affordable, WTCA is now able to take installment payments using Afterpay.

Afterpay offers the ability to split payments into 4 installments to make payments easier to manage. Payments are made via our secure Square site and details are provided upon request.

Afterpay may include its own fees or charges separate from your payment for using this service, and anyone using this service are advised to be sure they understand all the terms and conditions of Afterpay’s service prior to establishing a payment agreement with them.

Currently use of Afterpay is for class term fees, however WTCA plans to extend this to other services in due course. Information about our classes can be found here.


Want to know what Tai Chi is like? Come to one of our Come N Try Tai Chi events! We have events scheduled in Brookfield, Cedarburg and Glendale!

Can’t make it to any of our current locations? Let us know where you would like to see us start a new class.

Are you a community group or business that would like to offer Qigong to your members/community/employees? Check out our Corporate and Community Qigong program.


Tag: taijiquan

The Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts has hosted a space for Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy to hold Tai Chi classes since 2020. This was our first official class in the Greater Milwaukee area, and we now hold Beginner and Intermediate classes at their facility.

WTCA is helping Sharon Lynne Wilson Center for the Arts celebrate their 20 years of making the arts accessible to the Greater Milwaukee community by holding two Come N Try Tai Chi for Free sessions during their Summer celebrations. These sessions will be held on Saturday mornings on June 25 and July 2 at from 8am. Following these sessions, attendees can continue the celebration with coffee and live music from 9am.

More information about the Come N Try Tai Chi sessions and our upcoming new Term of Tai Chi classes can be found on our website.


Want to know what Tai Chi is like? Come to one of our Come N Try Tai Chi events! We have events scheduled in Brookfield, Cedarburg and Glendale!

Can’t make it to any of our current locations? Let us know where you would like to see us start a new class.

Are you a community group or business that would like to offer Qigong to your members/community/employees? Check out our Corporate and Community Qigong program.


Tag: taijiquan

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy is pleased to announce we will be opening a new class in Cedarburg.

The new class will be held at Faith Lutheran Church on Tuesday mornings from 10-11am. Details can be found on our Classes page.

For a limited time new students who pre-register will be eligible to receive a $20.00 discount on their term fees! Register now to receive details of this offer.

The Cedarburg class represents our fifth class as we continue to grow and make Tai Chi available to as many people as possible. We look forward to welcoming new students to our Cedarburg class.


Want to know what Tai Chi is like? Come to one of our Come N Try Tai Chi events! We have events scheduled in Brookfield, Cedarburg and Glendale!

Can’t make it to any of our current locations? Let us know where you would like to see us start a new class.

Are you a community group or business that would like to offer Qigong to your members/community/employees? Check out our Corporate and Community Qigong program.


Tag: taijiquan

If there’s one thing I’ve often thought to myself in over 20 years of practicing Tai Chi, it’s: “why didn’t I start doing this 20 years earlier?”

The idea that Tai Chi is “just for old people” most likely evolved because it is often promoted as a safe, gentle and effective form of exercise, especially for those with age-related changes to their health: arthritis, impaired balance, decreased mobility; “old people”. While Tai Chi and Qigong have been proven to have great benefits and be effective for older people, the same can be said for people in all age groups. In fact, the benefits gained from practicing Tai Chi and Qigong from a younger age can help decrease the risk and/or severity of age-related health changes later in life.

Tai Chi is a martial art – taijiquan – and under proper instruction is as much a form of exercise as any other martial art. Though often (though not always) practiced slowly to focus on the internal aspects of the art, each form in Tai Chi still has self-defense application, and these can be applied to real-life encounters. Some styles of Tai Chi can be quite physically demanding; my Master often stated that traditionally instruction in certain Chen forms would not be commenced once a person reached middle age due to their physical demands.

Tai Chi and Qigong practice can offer people of all ages many benefits, including:

  • increased strength and flexibility;
  • improved balance, coordination, proprioception (awareness of body position) and spatial awareness (your body’s position in relation to your surroundings);
  • improved cardiopulmonary, neurological and immune system function;
  • enhanced mindfulness, attention, and concentration/focus;
  • encourages commitment, self-awareness and self-discipline.

We need to dispel the idea that Tai Chi is only for “old people” and therefore can or should only be practiced in the later stages of life. Tai Chi is not only suitable for people of all ages, it is one of the few forms of exercise that can be continuously practiced throughout the lifespan, and whose benefits later in life are only enhanced by commencing as early in life as possible.

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy welcomes people of all ages who want to learn Tai Chi and Qigong. Find a class or come and try session at a location near you.


Tag: taijiquan

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy’s second term of the year commences in the first week of April and there are now four class locations to choose from. Our original classes in Evansville and Brookfield are now joined by classes in Glendale and the Waukesha side of Brookfield.

WTCA welcomes all new students of all ages and abilities to Tai Chi. To find a class near you see our Classes section.


Tag: taijiquan

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy is pleased to announce our new partnership with Momentum Movement Clinic and will be commencing a new Tai Chi class at their premises in Brookfield, Wisconsin, in April 2022. WTCA’s Founder and Instructor Ray Gates said the partnership with Momentum is “a natural fit”, as Tai Chi and Qigong practice together with the therapies offered by Momentum’s Owner and Structural Integrationist Lisa McNeil and her staff would be “highly complementary to one another, and should provide people with maximal health and wellness, particularly with regards to healthy, functional movement.”

Momentum’s Lisa McNeil is excited with the partnership. “Tai Chi and Qigong blend specific movements designed to stretch, strengthen, and re-balance injured or painful body regions with focused breathing and enhanced body awareness combining common sense and intuitive body wisdom. Bringing this movement practice to the clinic is going to help clients reach their mobility and pain goals,” she said.

Classes will be held Thursday mornings from April 7. Further information and registration is available in our Classes section.


Tag: taijiquan

I’ve been involved in exercise of one form or another for most of my life, whether it was playing sports, weight training at the gym, martial arts training, or simply enjoying long walks and hikes. This became even more so as I became a physical therapist – exercise literally became the way I made my living.

One of the key principles of effective exercise is ensuring that you have effective strategies for recovery following exercise. Recovery is important because it is what helps the body make positive adaptations and thus gain the benefit from the exercise being performed. Without proper recovery, exercise may do more harm than good – this is why many sports and high level exercise programs have ‘rest’ days to allow the body to adapt and heal following exercise. If you’ve engaged in any sort of sport and exercise you’re probably familiar with stretching after exercise to avoid injury, though exercise science research continues to argue whether stretching is effective for recovery. Elite level athletes often use ‘cross-training’ activities – that is activities and exercises not necessarily related to their actual sport – as a form of recovery from their regular training, and the research has demonstrated that this has benefits to their overall performance and ability to improve.

Tai Chi and Qigong are both well known for their wide range of benefits as forms of exercise. Clinical research is increasingly demonstrating evidence that Tai Chi and Qigong are useful adjuncts to other forms of exercise in maximizing the overall effects and outcomes of exercise or rehabilitation programs. Most research tends to take place in health-compromised populations, for example, those with specific illness or conditions (eg: Parkinson’s Disease, cancer, etc.), those with recent trauma or injury (eg: after stroke, heart attack, etc.) and those who are at risk of decline as a part of the aging process. Yet there hasn’t been a lot of investigation on Tai Chi and Qigong in already healthy/fit populations, nor does there appear to be any research looking at the benefits Tai Chi and Qigong could have in post-exercise recovery. Given the multitude of benefits already demonstrated by Tai Chi and Qigong in terms of gains in strength, flexibility, balance, and mental and emotional wellbeing, it seems reasonable to expect that Tai Chi and Qigong would be very effective in facilitating post-exercise recovery. I started to look into this with my own exercise, and my experience tells me we need to be examining this more closely.

My Experience with Tai Chi and Qigong Following Exercise

I first started weight training when I was about 15 years old and have engaged in this kind of training on and off ever since, including now. As such, I’m very familiar with the soreness and fatigue that comes from a good weights session, and the importance of allowing adequate recovery time to avoid injury and facilitate adaptive changes in the body.

About 10 years ago I had the opportunity to recommence a gym program focused on both building strength and weight reduction after a considerable time away from this type of exercise. My program consisted both anaerobic (mostly free weights training) and aerobic (treadmill, cross-trainer/elliptical or rowing machine) exercises. When I committed to starting the program I knew I would be starting from a low level and it would take time to build up to where I had previously been, and I knew what I was in for, especially in those early weeks! The difference this time, though was that I planned to practice my Tai Chi and Qigong sets after I exercised.

At the time my only intention for including Tai Chi and Qigong practice was to spend more practicing these sets by taking opportunity of the time I was setting aside for exercise. I had not considered that there could be any sort of specific benefit to practicing my Tai Chi and Qigong after exercise beyond ensuring that I was getting my practice in!

My experience was almost immediate, to the point where it took me a little while to make any sort of connection. The first week of starting my program, I noticed that I was not experiencing the level of soreness or fatigue I was expecting from the gym sessions. This is not to say I didn’t experience any, just not anywhere near what I expected. I put this down to the idea that I was “easing back into it” and not working out as hard as I potentially could. I felt this was a reasonable approach, though I was keen to make gains, and so from the second week on I started to challenge myself.

As the weeks went on though, I realized that I was making gains – in terms of increased strength (increasing the resistance of my exercises) and stamina (increasing the time spent on aerobic exercises) at a faster rate than I had ever previously achieved. More than that, rather than feel fatigued at the end of an exercise session, I felt energized and the soreness I experienced was minimal. I started to wonder if my Tai Chi and Qigong could explain what was happening, so I tried a little experiment. For one week, I continued with my gym program but did not practice my Tai Chi and Qigong afterwards – though I did continue to practice them at my regular classes twice a week.

Again, the effect was almost instantaneous. After the second session of the week I felt more sore and more fatigued. Not only that, but I felt ‘stiff’ and ‘tight’, like I needed a good stretch. I particularly found my aerobic components became more laborious and harder to maintain at the level I had been doing. By midway through the week I was so convinced I wanted to restart my Tai Chi and Qigong practice just so I wouldn’t feel this way after a workout, however I persisted with abstaining from it for the week in an attempt to try and confirm (at least to myself) what was happening.

When I restarted my Tai Chi and Qigong practice after exercising the following week, everything went back to the way it was: less soreness, less tiredness, and feeling ‘good’ after each session. To me there seemed to be a clear link between the two.

I must admit this is by no means any sort of proof that Tai Chi and Qigong can assist with post-exercise recovery – at best it’s anecdotal evidence – but as a physical therapist and a student of exercise science, I believe it’s enough to warrant further investigation through clinical research.

Possible Explanations for How Tai Chi and Qigong Facilitate Post-Exercise Recovery

Assuming the benefits I experienced are a result of including Tai Chi and Qigong practice following exercise, what could the possible explanation be? The immediate consideration relates to the flow of qi in the body, and way that Tai Chi and Qigong improve qi flow, and the subsequent benefits this has on one’s health. However, Western science still struggles with the concept of qi, and though evidence is growing in support of biofield medicine (a term used to explain the effects of energies known as qi, prana, mana, etc.), at this time it’s likely that any clinical research will want a more ‘physiological’ explanation in order to validate any evidence that becomes apparent through studies. In my own consideration of this, I would suggest Tai Chi and Qigong practice post-exercise could influence the following mechanisms:

  • improved clearance of waste metabolites formed during exercise;
  • enhanced circulation and efficiency of the cardiovascular system;
  • improved action and efficiency of the immune system;
  • enhanced restoration of a normal/resting physiological state (heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, etc.) post-exercise; and/or
  • enhanced restoration of psychological/emotional state post-exercise.

This is by no means an exhaustive list, however I feel it is a reasonable starting place for clinical research and one that would be relatively easy for experienced researchers in exercise and sports sciences to develop studies for.

A Call for Further Research

With the increasing evidence of the benefits of Tai Chi and Qigong across the health and wellness spectrum, as well as their relative ease of application (no need for costly or special equipment, for example), it only makes sense to investigate the potential practices could have on enhancing the effects of exercise. If it can be demonstrated that Tai Chi and Qigong can enhance post-exercise recovery, and this in turn enhances ability for people to participate in exercise programs, imagine the potential this has for exercise in all settings: from school-based sports and athletics programs, to rehabilitation programs, to elite level athletic performance. Tai Chi and Qigong could be a game changer in a very literal sense.

Wisconsin Tai Chi Academy, and our Instructor Ray Gates, welcomes the opportunity to partner with and assist any researchers wanting to investigate the effects and benefits of Tai Chi and Qigong, whether related to post-exercise recovery or otherwise. If you have a study or project you would like our involvement with, please use this link to Contact Us.